Stars of NBC’s ‘This Is Us’ hit red carpet for SXSW screening of season finale

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We promise: WE WILL NOT SPOIL THE SEASON FINALE OF “THIS IS US.”

The finale, which screened Monday afternoon during the South by Southwest Film Festival, offered plenty of tears and plenty of laughs, too, to a packed audience at the Paramount Theatre. It airs Tuesday night on NBC.

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Mandy Moore, who plays Rebecca Pearson on NBC’s “This Is Us,” on the red carpet at the Paramount Theatre during SXSW on March 12. Kristin Finan/American-Statesman

Before the screening, the audience heeded a call from actor Milo Ventimiglia, who plays Jack Pearson on the NBC drama, to put their phones down. When one of America’s favorite TV dads speaks, the audience listens.

RELATED: Keep up with all SXSW happenings at Austin360.com. 

Ventimiglia joined costars Mandy Moore, who plays his TV wife, Rebecca Pearson, and Justin Hartley, who plays his adult son, Kevin Pearson, on the red carpet prior to the screening.

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Milo Ventimiglia, who plays Jack Pearson on NBC’s “This Is Us,” on the red carpet at the Paramount Theatre during SXSW March 12. Kristin Finan/American-Statesman

“The show is emotional, but it’s ‘hopefully emotional,’” Ventimiglia told Austin360. “I think that’s something that kind of makes up for how many tears you cry, you know, because it’s one of those feel-good cries.”

The show has struck a chord with viewers in part because it touches on a variety of important themes including adoption, foster care, obesity and addiction.

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Justin Hartley, who plays Kevin Pearson on NBC’s “This Is Us,” on the red carpet at the Paramount Theatre March 12. Kristin Finan/American-Statesman

“For me if we can get one person to make a phone call that maybe they would not have made, if it helps them, then we’ve done our job,” said Hartley, whose character battled alcohol and prescription drug addiction this season. “I was proud of the way that we told that story.”

Ventimiglia, Moore and Hartley will also speak as part of the ‘This Is Us’ SXSW cast panel on Tuesday at 12:30 p.m. at the Austin Convention Center, Ballroom D.

What people are saying about the Austin film ‘Song to Song’

“Song to Song” filming wrapped in Austin nearly six years ago and the world finally got a look at the Terrence Malick flick at its South by Southwest premiere Friday night.

The film is not short on star power with Ryan Gosling and Rooney Mara as up-and-coming musicians, Michael Fassbender as a music producer and Natalie Portman as a waitress.

The movie features scenes all over Austin, including the Austin City Limits Music Festival, Fun Fun Fun Fest and the infamous Sixth Street. So how does Malick’s tenth feature film stack up critically?

Here’s the short of it:

  • The word “toxic” comes up in at least three articles on the film to describe Fassbender’s character. Yikes.
  • This is a Malick film, so expect beautifully crafted shots featuring Austin’s urban landscape.
  • Generally everyone understands that while the movie is described as “a modern love story set against the Austin, Texas music scene,” there’s not much Austin (nor music scene) about it.
  • And while the reaction ranges from “um, okay” to “absolutely breathtaking,” the film sits at a measly 50 percent on Rotten Tomatoes and 7 out of 10 on IMDb.

The American-Statesman’s film critic Joe Gross watched the much-hyped film during the SXSW screening on Friday night. As previously mentioned, the film doesn’t live up to its Austin music scene billing nor do the Gosling and Mara portray being a musician with much authenticity in the first place.

No wonder these two are struggling. They might as well be plumbers or lawyers or farmers for all of the songwriting they do.

Gross also touches on the “California-meets-Texas” attitude of the film, a genuine confusing identity experienced by residents of the Live Music Capital of the World.

If beloved Austinite Terrence Malick’s “Song to Song,” which opened South by Southwest on Friday, is a meditation on the shallow, flash-over-substance, Los Angeles-ization of Austin, then it is a bullseye.

RELATED: Ten takeaways from “Made in Austin: A Look into Song to Song” at SXSW

The Independent’s Christopher Hooton raves about the film, calling it “life-changing.” Clearly in awe of the film, Hooton lists some “impressive things about the film,” including:

The notion of the ‘camera as a character’ is cliché, but if it were one here it would simultaneously be a drunkard lost on the way to the canapé table, a fan with reverntially documenting a star with an iPhone, and God himself.

Hooton gives the film a perfect 5-star rating, explaining that though “Song to Song” is largely “avant-garde stuff,” it all comes together perfectly.

The Guardian rates the film four out of five stars, with reviewer Jordan Hoffman describing the film as “the story of hungry souls gorging themselves at the wrong buffet.”

Hoffman demonstrates his own first-hand knowledge of Austin as he critques the film’s take on the city.

This movie about Austin features not one stout, bearded dude in an Empire Strikes Back T-shirt – and that makes it damn lie.

One bonus: Patti Smith’s unforgettable cameo.

RELATED: Here are the musical cameos to look for as ‘Song to Song’ opens SXSW Film

The Wrap names three Hollywood stars given “the famous Malick chop.” Christian Bale, Benicio del Toro and Haley Bennett were sliced out of the already-ensemble cast during production despite being named in the initial casting announcement.

Both Bale and del Toro shot scenes with Malick back in 2011, with Bale’s character having a lot in common with Fassbender’s.

Fassbender’s character, a toxic music executive, was said to be so similar to Bale that no one was sure if he would be included at all, the insider added.

The Wrap goes on to call the film a “gorgeously-shot love letter to the liberal Texas city.”

Deadline focused its attention on the mind-boggling fact that the original cut of the film was eight hours long.

Malick says “Is this going to be a miniseries? We have enough to make a different movie.”

Deadline also references the film’s production quirks, including Fassbender improvising lines, Malick’s need for more meetings with film execs and directing away from behind the camera.

Whether that was in fact the case here or not, Song to Song has a spontaneity that is very apparent – and that’s just fine with Malick.

Mashable probably has the least kind review of the film. Their headline reads, “Terrence Malick is just embarrassing movie stars with weird sex stuff right now.”

Josh Dickey writes the film is a buffet of things we’ve come to expect of Malick, including actors Keeping Austin Weird with each other in an impressively long list of ways.

Here’s where it all devolves into a muddled pastiche of Malick clichés: gorgeous nature shots, hissy-whispering nonsensical voice-over, and his latest kick, which is two movie stars — pick a combination, any combination — in a room, or a field, or a puddle, doing incredibly weird things to each other’s bodies.

Dickey also reminds readers this is definitely not a film about the Austin music scene.

Speaking of the music industry — don’t be fooled, SXSW fans. Song to Song says about as much about the Austin music scene as The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift says about the Austin music scene.

So is “Song to Song” worth movie fare? Decide for yourself when the film hits theaters nationwide March 17.

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Rick Blaine, Clyde Barrow, a serial killer and “the king of the world” to open Paramount Summer Classic film series

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This dude is coming to the Paramount. (The film, not Leo himself.)

The Paramount and Stateside Theatres announced the opening weekend (May 25–28) lineup for the 2017 Summer Classic Film Series.

The traditional opener is always “Casablanca.” This year it is joined by “Titanic” (directed by James Cameron), which turns 20 this year, and a double feature of “Bonnie and Clyde” (directed by Arthur Penn), which turns 50 this year, and Terrence Malick’s still-stellar directorial debut “Badlands.”

 To wit:

“Casablanca”/  7 p.m. May 25

“Titanic” / 7:30 p.m. May 26

“Bonnie & Clyde” / 2 p.m. May 28

“Badlands” / 4:10 p.m. May 28

To purchase a movie ticket or view the full lineup (which is not out yet), go here.

The Paramount Theatre announces Summer Classic Film lineup; goes digital

It’s repertory season, also known as summer, which means the lineup for the 2016 Summer Classic film series at the Paramount and Stateside Theatres is out now.

2016 marks 41 years of Paramount’s signature classic films series, which goes from May 26 through September 4. Film tickets are on sale now at austintheatre.org.

This year, the Paramount unveils a new digital projection system, new sound system and  new screen (they will retain the capacity to screen 35mm and 70mm prints whenever available).

Before the series formally starts, look for the “Bridesmaids” Pub Run May 24. There will be booze and then a screening of Paul Feig’s modern comedy classic.

MPW-11602This year’s series once again kicks-off with Michael Curtiz’s “Casablanca” as the opening night film with screenings May 26 and 27.

The popular Martinis & Manicures event returns July 10 with, as one might imagine, martinis and manicures before a screening of Steven Soderbergh’s “Magic Mike.”

Additionally, Iron and Wine’s Sam Beam (a former Dripping Springs resident who moved to North Carolina in 2014) will return July 22 for a special screening of Austin filmmaker Andrew Bujalski’s”Computer Chess.”

There are a whole mess of anniversary screenings this year.

Look for 75th anniversary presentations of the 1941 classics “The Maltese Falcon” and “Citizen Kane” as well as the 100th anniversary of  D.W. Griffiths’ “Intolerance,” the 80th anniversary of Charlie Chaplin’s still-perfect “Modern Times,” and the 95th anniversary of Chaplin’s “The Kid,” which screen in a new digital restoration.

Also look for the 50th anniversary of Sergio Leone‘s “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly” and Mike Nichols’ “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?,” the 20th anniversary of the Coen brothers’ “Fargo” and Baz Luhrmann’s  “Romeo + Juliet.”

The Family Film Festival series kicks off with a double feature of Joe Pytka’s “Space Jam” and Michael Pressman’s “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Secret of the Ooze” on June 5, and a special 50th anniversary screening of Les Martinson’s “Batman: The Movie” (aka Batman ’66), July 30.

To celebrate the end of primary season, expect the Leo McCarey’s Marx brothers movie “Duck Soup,” Alan J Pakula’s “All the President’s Men,” John Fankenheimer’s “The Manchurian Candidate” and more.

There are musicals and science-fiction, foreign films and  “Grease” sing-along. In late August, Marilyn Monroe and James Dean will be feted with screenings of Howard Hawks’ “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, Billy Wilder’s “Some Like It Hot,” Elia Kazan’s “East of Eden,” Nicholas Ray’s “Rebel Without a Cause” and George Stevens’ “Giant” (the latter turns 60 this year).  The Summer Classic Film Series closes Sept. 4 with “Gone with the Wind.”

There are a couple of ticketing options.

Tickets are available online, by phone, or at Paramount Box Office.  General Admission is  $12, Film Fan Admission is $7. The Film Fan program involves free admission to two member parties, reserved seating, discounted tickets and more. Full details available online at www.austintheatre.org/filmfan.

The Flix Tix program gives you a book of 10 admissions, good in any combination to the Paramount’s Summer Classic Film Series for only $60 ($50 for Film Fans).

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Here is a the full slate.  Films screening at the Paramount will be marked with a (P), while films screening at Stateside will be marked with a (S). DCP means the print is digital.

 

(P) “Casablanca” (1942, 102min/b&w, 35mm)  7pm Thurs 5/26, 9pm Fri 5/27.

(P) “The Maltese Falcon” (1941, 100min/b&w, DCP)  Directed by John Huston. 9pm Thurs 5/26, 7pm Fri 5/27.

(P) “The Third Man” (1949, 104min/b&w, DCP) Directed by Carol Reed. 3pm Sat 5/28, 4:15pm Sun 5/29.

(P) “Citizen Kane” (1941, 119min/b&w, 35mm) Directed by Orson Welles. 5pm Sat 5/28, 2pm Sun 5/29.

(P) “The Thin Man” (1934, 93min/b&w, 35mm)  Directed by W.S. Van Dyke. 7pm Tues 5/31.

8be67ff49a859cf843760b167c5b7bc5(P) “Cabaret” (1972, 124min/color, DCP) Directed by Bob Fosse.  8:50pm Tues 5/31.

(P) “Labyrinth” (1986, 102min/color, 35mm) Directed by Jim Henson. 7pm Thurs 6/2.

(P) “Purple Rain” (1984, 111min/color, DCP) Directed by Albert Magnoli. 9pm Thurs 6/2.

(P) “Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb” (1964, 94min/b&w, DCP) Directed by Stanley Kubrick. 7pm Fri 6/3.

(P) “The Shining” (1980, 144min/color, 35mm) Directed by Stanley Kubrick. 8:55pm Fri 6/3.

(P) “Space Jam” (1996, 88min/color, DCP) Directed by Joe Pytka. 2pm Sun 6/5.

(P) “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Secret of the Ooze” (1991, 90min/color, 35mm) Directed by Michael Pressman. 3:45pm Sun 6/5.

(P) “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington” (1939, 129min/b&w, DCP) Directed by Frank Capra. 7pm Tues 6/7, 8:25pm Wed 6/8.

(P) “Duck Soup” (1933, 70min/b&w, 35mm) Directed by Leo McCarey. 9:25pm Tues 6/7, 7pm Wed 6/8.duck_soup_xlg

(S) “All the President’s Men” (1976, 139min/color, DCP) Directed by Alan J. Pakula. 7pm Thurs 6/9.

(P) “The Manchurian Candidate” (1962, 126min/b&w, DCP)  2:45pm Sun 6/12.

(P) “The Great Dictator” (1940, 126min/b&w, 35mm) Directed by Charlie Chaplin. 5:05pm Sun 6/12.

(P) “Dumbo” (1941, 64min/color, DCP) Directed by Ben Sharpsteen. 1pm Sun 6/12.

(P) “The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance” (1962, 123min/b&w, 35mm) Directed by John Ford. 7pm Mon 6/13, 9:15pm Tues 6/14.

(P) “The Searchers” (1956, 119min/color, 35mm) Directed by John Ford.  9:20pm Mon 6/13, 7pm Tues 6/14.

(P) “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly” (1966, 179min/color, DCP) Directed by Sergio Leone. 7pm Wed 6/15.

(P) “Shane” (1953, 118min/color, DCP) Directed by George Stevens. 7pm Thurs 6/16.

(P) “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” (1969, 110min/color, DCP) Directed by George Roy Hill.  9:15pm Thurs 6/16.

Stagecoach_US_half2(S) “Stagecoach” (1939, 96min/b&w, DCP) Directed by John Ford.  7pm Fri 6/17.

(S) “High Noon” (1952, 85min/b&w, DCP) Directed by Fred Zinnemann. 8:55pm Fri 6/17.

(S) “A Little Princess” (1995, 97min/color, digital) Directed by Alfonso Cuaron.  1pm Sat 6/18.

(S) “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (1975, 133min/color, DCP) Directed by Milos Forman.  3:15pm Sat 6/18, 4:35pm Sun 6/19.

(S) “A Clockwork Orange” (1971, 136min/color, DCP) Directed by Stanley Kubrick.  7pm Sat 6/18, 2pm Sun 6/19.

(P) “All About Eve” (1950, 138min/b&w, 35mm) Directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz.   7pm Tues 6/21, 9:05pm Wed 6/22.full.allabouteve-24623__58879.1462509140.360.360

(P) “Double Indemnity” (1944, 107min/b&w, DCP) Directed by Billy Wilder. 9:35pm Tues Tues 6/21, 7pm Wed 6/22.

(S) “Laura” (1944, 88min/b&w, DCP) Directed by Otto Preminger. 7pm Thurs 6/23.

(S) “Fargo” (1996, 98min/color, DCP) Directed by Joel and Ethan Coen. 8:45pm Thurs 6/23.

(P) “Blazing Saddles” (1974, 95min/color, DCP) 7pm Fri 6/24.

(P) “This Is Spinal Tap” (1984, 82min/color, DCP) 8:50pm Fri 6/24.

(P) “The Godfather” (1972, 177min/color, DCP)  Directed by Francis Ford Coppola.   3pm Sat 6/25.

Adventures_of_Robin_Hood_(1938) 1xs(P) “The Godfather Part II” (1974, 200min/color, DCP) Directed by Francis Ford Coppola. 7 pm Sat 6/25.

(P) “Ben-Hur” (1959, 212min/color, DCP) Directed by William Wyler.  3:30pm Sun 6/26.

(P) “The Adventures of Robin Hood” (1938, 102min/color, 35mm) Directed by Michael Curtiz and William Keighley. 1pm Sun 6/26.

(P) “Intolerance” (1916, 170min/b&w/silent w/English intertitles, DCP) Directed by D.W. Griffith. 7pm Tues 6/28.

(P) “Modern Times” (1936, 87min/b&w/silent w/English intertitles, 35mm) Directed by Charlie Chaplin. 7pm Wed 6/29.

(P) “The Kid” (1921, 53min/b&w/silent w/English intertitles, DCP) Directed by Charlie Chaplin. 8:45pm Wed 6/29.

(P) “Oklahoma!” (1955, 145min/color, DCP) Directed by Fred Zinnemann. 7pm Tues 7/5.

(P) “The King and I” (1956, 133min/color, DCP) Directed by Walter Lang. 7pm Wed 7/6.timthumb

(P) “Gigi” (1958, 115min/color, DCP) Directed by Vincente Minnelli. 7pm Thurs 7/7.

(P) “Moulin Rouge!” (2001, 127min/color, DCP) Directed by Baz Luhrmann. 9:15pm Thurs 7/7.

(P) “Dirty Dancing” (1987, 100min/color, DCP) Directed by Emile Ardolino. 7pm Fri 7/8.

(P) “Flashdance” (1983, 95min/color, 35mm) Director by Adrian Lyne 8:55pm Fri 7/8.

(P) “The Sound of Music” (1965, 174min/color, DCP) Directed by Robert Wise. 3pm Sat 7/9.

(P) “Grease” (1978, 110min/color, DCP) Directed by Randal Kleiser. 7pm Sat 7/9.

(P) “Magic Mike” (2012, 110min/color, DCP) Directed by Steven Soderbergh. 2pm, 6pm Sun 7/10.

(P) “Metropolis” (1927, 148min/b&w/silent w/English intertitles, DCP) 7pm Tues 7/12.

ThingPoster(P) “The Thing” (1982, 109min/color, 35mm) Directed by John Carpenter. 7pm Wed 7/13, 9:15pm Thurs 7/14.

(P) “Blade Runner” (1982, 118min/color, DCP) Directed by Ridley Scott. 9:05pm Wed 7/13, 7pm Thurs 7/14.

(P) “The Fellowship of the Ring” (2001, 228min/color, DCP) Directed by Peter Jackson. 7pm Fri 7/15.

(P) “The Two Towers” (2002, 235min/color, DCP) Directed by Peter Jackson. 2pm Sat 7/16.

(P) “The Return of the King” (2003, 263min/color, DCP) Directed by Peter Jackson. 2pm Sun 7/17.

(P) ”Hannah and Her Sisters” (1986, 106min/color, 35mm) Directed by Woody Allen. 7pm Tues 7/19, 8:50pm Wed 7/20.

(P) “Annie Hall” (1977, 93min/color, 35mm) Directed by Woody Allen. 9:05pm Tues 7/19, 7pm Wed 7/20.

(P) “The Graduate” (1967, 106min/color, DCP) Directed by Mike Nichols. 7pm Thurs 7/21.Original_movie_poster_for_the_film_Who's_Afraid_of_Virginia_Woolf-

(P) “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966, 131min/b&w, 35mm) Directed by Mike Nichols. 9:05pm Thurs 7/21.

(S) “M*A*S*H” (1970, 116min/color, DCP) Directed by Robert Altman. 2pm Sun 7/24

(S) “Nashville” (1975, 159min/color, DCP) Directed by Robert Altman. 4:15pm Sun 7/24.

(P) “Computer Chess” (2013, 93min/b&w, DCP) Directed by Andrew Bujalski. 7pm Fri 7/22.

(P) “Adaptation” (2002, 115min/color, 35mm) Directed by Spike Jonze. 7pm Tues 7/26.

(P) “BBill_&_Tedarton Fink” (1991, 116min/color, 35mm) Directed by Joel and Ethan Coen  9:10pm Tues 7/26.

(P) “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” (1975, 91min/color, DCP) Directed by Terry Gilliam and Terry Jones. 7pm Wed 7/27, 8:45pm Thurs 7/28.

(P) “Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure” (1989, 90min/color, DCP) Directed by Stephen Herek. 8:50pm Wed 7/27, 7pm Thurs 7/28.

(S) “Hoop Dreams” (1994, 172min/color, DCP) Directed by Steve James. 7pm Fri 7/29.

(P) “Batman: The Movie” (1966, 105min/color, 35mm) Directed by Leslie H. Martinson. 2pm Sat 7/30.

(P) “Goodfellas” (1990, 145min/color, DCP) Directed by Martin Scorsese. 3:30pm Sat 7/30, 6:55pm Sun 7/31.

(P) “Reservoir Dogs” (1992, 99min/color, DCP) Directed by Quentin Tarantino. 6:10pm Sat 7/30, 5pm Sun 7/31.

(P) “The Age of Innocence” (1993, 139min/color, DCP) Directed by Martin Scorsese. 7pm Tues 8/2.

(P) “Romeo + Juliet” (1996, 120min/color, DCP) Directed by Baz Luhrmann. 7pm Wed 8/3.Orlando_film_poster

(P) “Orlando” (1992, 94min/color, 35mm) Directed by Sally Potter. 9:15pm Wed 8/3.

(P) “The Italian Job” (1969, 99min/color, DCP) Directed by Peter Collinson. 7pm Thurs 8/4, 9:20pm Fri 8/5.

(P) “How to Steal a Million” (1966, 123min/color, DCP) Directed by William Wyler. 8:55pm Thurs 8/4, 7pm Fri 8/5.

(P) “Aladdin” (1992, 91min/color, DCP) Directed by Ron Clements and John Musker. 1pm Sat 8/6.

(P) “Jaws” (1975, 124min/color, DCP) Directed by Steven Spielberg. 3:15pm Sat 8/6, 4:30pm Sun 8/7.

(P) “Jurassic Park” (1993, 127min/color, DCP) Directed by Steven Spielberg. 5:30pm Sat 8/6, 2pm Sun 8/7.

Persona_Poster(P) “Persona” (1966, 84min/b&w/Swedish w/ English subtitles, 35mm) Directed by Ingmar Bergman. 7pm Tues 8/9.

(P) “Blow-Up” (1966, 110min/color, DCP) Directed by Michelangelo Antonioni. 8:40pm Tues 8/9.

(P) ”Beauty and the Beast” (1946, 93min/b&w/French w/ English subtitles, 35mm) Directed by Jean Cocteau.7pm Wed 8/10, 9:30pm Thurs 8/11.

(P) “The Red Shoes” (1948, 133min/color, 35mm) Directed by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger. 8:50pm Wed 8/10, 7pm Thurs 8/11.

(S) “Ran” (1985, 162min/color/Japanese w/English subtitles, DCP) Directed by Akira Kurosawa. 3:45pm Sun 8/14.

(P) “Annie” (1982, 128min/color, DCP) Directed by John Huston. 1pm Sun 8/14.

(P) “The 39 Steps” (1935, 86min/b&w, DCP) Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. 7pm Tues 8/16, 9:15pm Wed 8/17.

(P) “The Man Who Knew Too Much” (1956, 120min/color, 35mm) Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. 8:45pm Tues 8/16, 7pm Wed 8/17.

(S) “Notorious” (1946, 101min/b&w, digital) Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. 7:15pm Tues 8/16, 9:10 pm Wed 8/17.

(S) “The Lady Vanishes” (1938, 97min/b&w, DCP) Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. 9:15pm Tues 8/16, 7:15 pm Wed 8/17.Strangers_on_a_Train_(film)

(P) “Strangers on a Train” (1951, 101min/b&w, 35mm) Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. 7pm Thurs 8/18, 9 pm Fri 8/19.

(P) “Suspicion” (1941, 99min/b&w, 35mm) Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. T9:00pm Thurs 8/18, 7pm Fri 8/19.

(P) “Rear Window” (1954, 112min/color, 35mm) Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. 4pm Sat 8/20, 4pm Sun 8/21.

(P) “Psycho” (1960, 109min/b&w, 35mm) Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. 6:05pm Sat 8/20, 2pm Sun 8/21.

(P) “Mary PoppinsIndiana_Jones_and_the_Last_Crusade_A” (1964, 140min/color, DCP) Directed by Robert Stevenson. 1pm Sat 8/20.

(P) “2001: A Space Odyssey” (1968, 160min/color, 70mm) Directed by Stanley Kubrick. 7pm Tues 8/23, 7pm Wed 8/24.

(P) “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” (1989, 127min/color, 70mm) Directed by Steven Spielberg. 7pm Thurs 8/25, 7pm Fri 8/26.

(P) “Lawrence of Arabia” (1962, 216min/color, 70mm) Directed by David Lean. 3pm Sat 8/27, 2pm Sun 8/28.

(P) “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes” (1953, 91min/color, DCP) Directed by Howard Hawks. 7pm Tues 8/30, 9:20pm Wed 8/31.

(P) “Some Like It Hot” (1959, 121min/b&w, DCP) Directed by Billy Wilder. 8:50pm Tues 8/30, 7pm Wed 8/31.

(P) “East of Eden” (1955, 115min/color, DCP) Directed by Elia Kazan.  7pm Thurs 9/1, 9:10pm Fri 9/2.338px-Kingkong33newposter

(P) “Rebel Without a Cause” (1955, 111min/color, DCP)  Directed by Nicholas Ray. 9:10pm Thurs 9/1, 7pm Fri 9/2.

(P) “Giant” (1956, 201min/color, DCP) Directed by George Stevens. 3:30pm Sat 9/3

(P) “King Kong” (1933, 104min/b&w, DCP) Directed by Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedstack. 1pm Sat 9/3.

(P) “Gone with the Wind” (1939, 238min/color, 35mm) Directed by Victor Fleming.

SXSW Film: Gyllenhaal shines in ‘Demolition’

Jake Gyllenhaal as "Davis" in Demolition. Photo courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures. © 2016 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation All Rights Reserved
Jake Gyllenhaal as “Davis” in Demolition. Photo courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures. © 2016 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation All Rights Reserved

“Demolition” starts with a horrific scene, a car crash that kills the wife of Davis (Jake Gyllenhaal), a successful Wall Street banker. But strangely, he can’t feel anything.

Then he meets a customer service representative and her young, troubled son, who likes to bang on drums in the garage of their Queens, N.Y., home. And that leads Davis on a journey to finding himself again, partly through demolishing things and partly through finding his inner child.

In one highly surprising scene shortly after his wife’s death, he decides to not really care about anything any more and starts dancing down Wall Street on his way to work. Or as director Jean Marc Vallee says, he’s let himself become a “rock ‘n’ roller” again after following all the rules to get ahead.

“The childlike journey of Davis is really about honesty,” Gyllenhaal says. “And I could finally experience this through him.”

“Demolition” premieres tonight at 9:30 at the Paramount, during South by Southwest.

It has only one screening during the festival, and I recommend you be there.