Diane Lane learns to enjoy life in ‘Paris Can Wait’

Eleanor Coppola and her husband Francis Ford Coppola were attending the Cannes Film Festival in 2009, and they were supposed to fly to Eastern Europe afterward, where he had business. But Ms. Coppola had a bad head cold and was worried about flying. So a business associate agreed to drive her back to Paris, where the Coppolas have an apartment, and her husband would join her after finishing his business in Eastern Europe.

But what was supposed to a drive of only a few hours turned into a multi-day trip, with her French comapanion making numerous stops along the way for wine, food and cultural explorations. When Ms. Coppola told friends about her experience, they said she should make a movie.

That movie is “Paris Can Wait,” starring Diane Lane as Ms. Coppola, Alec Baldwin as Francis Ford Coppola and Arnuad Viard as the irrepressible Frenchman, Jacques.

As you might expect, the movie is gorgeous, with lush cinematography by Crystel Fournier, lavish sets and scenery that’s just about every traveler’s dream. The food doesn’t look too bad, either.

Lane’s character is actually named Anne Lockwood, and she’s in her 50s and wondering about her workaholic husband. So when a flirty business associate who eats and drinks and smokes too much, agrees to show her the secrets of the French countryside, she’s intrigued but a bit wary. What plays out over the rest of the movie is a kind of delicate dance, where Anne loosens up and begins to appreciate all the attention.

I know what you’re thinking. This is a movie for older women. Well, yes, it is. But it’s also a movie for everyone who loves France, or loves the thought of getting to know France. The movie is full of joie de vivre, and it should enchant young and old, both female and male. It’s called having a life — and enjoying it to the fullest.

Sony Pictures Classics has picked up distribution rights for the film, and they’ll probably do a good job of marketing. Even if they don’t, you should go see it. A release date hasn’t been set.

Ten takeaways from “Made in Austin: A Look into Song to Song” at SXSW

http://players.brightcove.net/1418563061/S15Aq3t8_default/index.html?videoId=5355819236001

 

Holy cats, there he is: Director Terrence Malick, one of the most private filmmakers of his generation, hanging out on stage with Richard Linklater and Michael Fassbender, the latter a star of Malick’s “Song to Song,” chatting Saturday morning at South by Southwest.

REVIEW: The gorgeous ‘Song to Song’ has little to do with music or Austin

PHOTOS: ‘Song to Song’ red carpet at the Paramount Theater

The original cut was about eight hours long. “There was no part of the shooting day that was idle,” Fassbender said. “If we were on the way to a location, we were shooting on the way to the location.”

On finding the character as one goes and the improvisational nature of the shoot. “I like not having lines to learn.” Fassbender said. “It’s a very liberating thing when you’re not carrying dialogue. It’s very hard not to load an intention if I am getting lines as I go.”

From left, Rooney Mara, Michael Fassbender and Ryan Gosling star in Terrence Malick’s “Song to Song.” Contributed by Van Redin / Broad Green Pictures

Sometimes, Malick is shooting something that is not the actor. “I’ll be acting my socks off and Terry will be filming a beetle,” Fassbender said.

On setting his films now rather than in the past.  Malick said he was a bit timid at setting his films in the present. “(One struggles to find) images you can use that haven’t been a part of advertising,” Malick said. “But then you find there are as many today as there were in the past.”

The original title was “Weightless.” “We had a title card from Virginia Woolf at the beginning,” Malick said. (“How can I proceed now, I said, without a self, weightless and visionless, through a world weightless…”). This ended up still being a bit of a theme.

On having, as Linklater put it, “punk rock elders” in the film. “I was trying not to be overwhelmed by these rock gods,” Fassbender said, “but I do remember that both Patti Smith and Flea, you would put the camera on them and words would just flow out. And then all of the Chili Peppers beat me up.”

Fassbender wishes there was more Val Kilmer kept in. “I was hanging on by my fingernails,” Fassbender said. “He is a force. To be in (this kind of movie), you have to be prepared to fall on your face over and over again all day. That is what I found so impressive about Val.”

On Fassbender maybe directing. “I would like to direct,” Fassbender said. “What would I like to direct? Something contained.” Which this film was not.

“I have no idea when,” he continued. “Starting as an actor, I found I was so focused for so many years on getting an opportunity to work, then focused on getting a lead role. (Now that he has done both of those things) I’ve started to enjoy more and more the collaborative process, the idea that you get the bunch of strangers together and get it to gel.”

On Austin changing. “Your film is already a period film,” Linklater joked. This is actually true, as Malick noted — Alamo Drafthouse South looks totally different now.

Linklater and Malick versus the movie: “Everything you see is the tip of the iceberg (for these characters),” Linklater said. “(To see these movies), I think it just adds a depth, a poetic memory feeling.”

In seeing the bits of pieces of their lives, Malick said, “It’s like the dialogue in the movie, ‘Can you live in this world moment to moment, song to song, kiss to kiss.’ It’s a hard thing to convey.”

 

 

 

 

SXSW: The gorgeous ‘Song to Song’ has little to do with music or Austin

http://players.brightcove.net/1418563061/S15Aq3t8_default/index.html?videoId=5355819236001

 

If beloved Austinite Terrence Malick’s “Song to Song,” which opened South by Southwest on Friday, is a meditation on the shallow, flash-over-substance, Los Angeles-ization of Austin, then it is a bullseye.

If it is a troll of contemporary Austin, if the idea is to mock a city overrun with poseurs-come-lately who dream of being artists without, you know, ever working at their craft, then “Song to Song” is one of the meanest movies ever lensed.

If it is a movie about gorgeous people wandering around hilariously empty Austin landscapes, photographed perfectly, touching each other, looking meaningfully at each other, then, sure.  And, hey: Nothing wrong with that.

And yet.

PHOTOS: “Song to Song” red carpet at SXSW

“Song to Song,” starring Ryan Gosling, Michael Fassbender and Rooney Mara, is, according to the blurb on the SXSW website, “a modern love story set against the Austin, Texas, music scene.”

This is essentially correct. “Song to Song” is a love story. It is in Austin, (though the city is never named). There are shots of bands playing and guitars being strummed. OK so far.

Here is the rest of the description: “two entangled couples — struggling songwriters Faye and BV, and music mogul Cook and the waitress whom he ensnares — chase success through a rock ‘n’ roll landscape of seduction and betrayal.”

This is where problems start.

It is a movie about the real world of popular music the way “Star Wars” is a samurai flick or a Western — a thematic and visual influence, perhaps, but that’s about it.

And it is a movie about Austin the way “Star Wars” is about Tunisia — it was shot there, but in terms of the flavor of the place, it might as well have been a matte painting.

Gosling is BV, one of these alleged songwriters. Songwriting is an activity we see him engage in, somewhat vaguely, once.

WHERE THE PARTY IS: Check out this interactive SXSW party guide

The rest of the time, we see him wander around town, wander around Fun Fun Fun, hang out backstage with the Chili Peppers, looking a lot more like an actor than a musician.

He becomes involved with Faye (Mara), who works on her music even less than BV.  Faye’s father has a strong Texas accent, implying that Mara is a native, which scans about as well as Audrey Hepburn playing a rodeo clown.

We see Faye playing guitar on stage at Fun Fun Fun, but we have no other context for what she does or whom she does it with — she, too, looks like an actor holding a guitar.

No wonder these two are struggling. They might as well be plumbers or lawyers or farmers for all of the songwriting they do.

Cook (Fassbender, who plays toxic masculinity better than anyone right now) is the sleazy record producer, which is definitely a type we have never seen before. He doesn’t ever seem to do any producing, outside of supervising (vaguely yelling at?) a string section in one scene and sort of admonishing BV in another. (There is no reason you, gentle reader, should remember “Laurel Canyon,” the 2002 bomb starring Frances McDormand as a record producer, but trust me, she was light-years more credible as someone who worked in pop music than Cook.)

Cook has a gorgeous house in Austin, one he says he’s lived in for “about two weeks,” which seems right on the money if, again, this is about terrible people who come to Austin seeking an authenticity they cannot name.

But Cook shouldn’t get too comfortable because he doesn’t really seem to know about the financial side of the music business either.

“I know you do the live music thing,” Cook says to BV, which is a series of words no record producer in history has ever actually said in that order to a songwriter/performer. “We should make a record together,” Cook says. “Don’t you want to make some money?”

Cook, I don’t know if you have been paying attention to the music business for the past 15 or so years, but making a record is an awfully hard way to make some money of late.

Anyway, Faye is sleeping with Cook, because of course she is. (This bit seems particularly disingenuous given the fiercely independent, OG punk rock icon Patti Smith’s lovely cameo.)

BV and Faye break up after BV finds out she has been sleeping with Cook. BV takes up with the older Amanda (Cate Blanchett). BV’s mother does not approve.

BV is also the sort who runs into an ex and asks, “What didn’t I know?” The ex responds, “How to feel.” I don’t know, lady; feeling seems to be the only thing these people do all day.

Cook, a flagrant womanizer, takes up with and marries Rhonda (Natalie Portman), a woman who says she has to waitress because she couldn’t find work as a teacher (!). In fact, another character in the film says she can’t find work as a teacher either — so she is a prostitute. There seems to be a bumper crop of teachers in Malick’s Austin.

Then again, given that every Austin location outside of the music festivals is so devoid of people that it looks like a neutron bomb hit it, maybe there aren’t enough children to sustain a mess of teachers. Our heroes spend most of the time wandering around a comically underpopulated Austin, voice-overs letting us know their thoughts, bits of dialogue advancing what little plot there is.

Standing on the balcony of (an otherwise completely empty) Mohawk, BV accuses Cook is stealing the copyrights to BV’s songs.  To which a viewer must ask, “What songs?” There is zero evidence on screen that these folks write anything, ever.

Indeed, it is to Malick’s credit that “Song to Song,” stunning-looking and meditative as it is, made me think about the very limitations of film as a medium. “Writing about music is like dancing about architecture” some wisenheimer once said, and I’ve always thought this was nonsense, not the least of which because I would love to see a dance about architecture.

But watching “Song to Song” made me wonder about Walter Pater’s maxim: “All art aspires to the condition of music.” Which is to say all other art falls far, far behind; all other art is only ever playing catch-up to what makes music, music. So one wonders about the extent to which any medium can capture music’s power, its resonance, the obsessive centrality it can take in one’s life. No form seems up to it: Novels about music are mostly awful; we know TV struggles (witness “Vinyl” and even “Empire,” which once did a decent job but is more about crime than studio time).

No wonder music documentaries are so popular, are so their own category. At least in music docs, there is an acknowledgment that they will only get so far at capturing the real-life felt experience of the concert, the studio, the rehearsal room, the men and women at a piano or with guitars or a computer, trying the find the proverbial bottled-lightning. There’s none of that in “Song to Song.”

But if you love looking at Fassbender and Gosling, Mara and Portman, empty clubs and houses and the Long Center and slow-motion moshing without what anyone is moshing to, then go for it.

Just don’t expect music.

 

Here are the musical cameos to look for as ‘Song to Song’ opens SXSW Film

The Terrence Malick-directed, Austin-filmed drama “Song to Song” will open the South by Southwest Film Festival on Friday with its world premiere at the Paramount Theatre.

The movie is described as a “modern love story set against the Austin, Texas music scene” and stars Ryan Gosling, Rooney Mara, Michael Fassbender and Natalie Portman.

RELATED: The trailer for ‘Song to Song’ features plenty of Fun Fun Fun

But — because it was filmed in part during several Austin music festivals — there is no shortage of musical artists who made the final cut of the film. Online magazine Pitchfork ran down what cameos you should look for as SXSW gets underway:

Lykke Li plays Ryan Gosling’s ex-lover and the two of them perform Bob Marley and the Wailers’ “It Hurts to Be Alone” together, in a version produced by Nigel Godrich. The Black Lips play Rooney Mara’s band, and, yes, that scene where Val Kilmer chainsaws an amp while Mara plays guitar on stage with them at Fun Fun Fun Fest is in the movie. (Austinite) Dana Falconberry plays Rooney Mara’s sister. (Austin band) Black Joe Lewis & the Honeybears play a band getting their record produced by Michael Fassbender.

Other musical artists in the film include:

  • Legends Iggy Pop, Patti Smith and former Sex Pistol John Lydon
  • California’s Red Hot Chili Peppers
  • Alan Palomo, whose band Neon Indian is from Denton
  • Bounce queen Big Freedia and rapper Spank Rock

Not surprising for a Malick film, several big names were filmed, but didn’t make the movie. Pitchfork mentions Arcade Fire, Fleet Foxes and Iron & Wine as among those to hit the cutting room floor.

Austin director Jeff Nichols: Showrunning? No. Mini-series? Yes.

Jeff Nichols is in the middle of an intense press tour for his new film “Loving,” which screens tonight (Oct. 13) at the Paramount as part of the Austin Film Festival.

Jeff Nichols (photo: Joe Gross)
Jeff Nichols (photo: Joe Gross/American-Statesman)

But he also discussed his relationship to another medium on display at AFF: television.

“The first time I ever got paid (for a script) was a pitch I did to HBO for a TV show,”  Nichols said in an interview Thursday. “And it was great. Brian Kavanaugh-Jones, my producing partner with Sarah Green, is like, ‘To this day, that’s the best script you’ve ever written.’ And it’s just sitting in turnaround at HBO.”

Then again, he wrote it when he was pretty young. “This was before ‘Take Shelter,'” Nichols said, “and at some point HBO was like, ‘This is real good but you are just not famous enough to have a one-hour drama on HBO.’

“And I said, ‘I completely understand. You’re developing something with Scorsese? Fair enough.’ And thank goodness they said that.”

Nichols said he wouldn’t want to  show-run an ongoing series but is interested in the mini-series format.

“What really appeals to me creatively right now is a four-, six- or eight-part piece” Nichols said. “I think ‘True Detective’ really broke down the door for having one filmmaker, one guiding voice, for a series.”

Nichols notes that while novellas are the perfect length for the traditional movie, novels have never been a great fit. “Everybody knows it, it’s just that there was no other option and now there is,” he said. “I’ve always wanted to do something with (William Faulkner’s novel) ‘Go Down, Moses,’ and there are certain things that need to be longer, they need to be six hours instead of two.”

cormacmccarthy_bloodmeridian“It’s very tempting to say you wanna make (Cormac McCarthy’s 1895 masterpiece Western) ‘Blood Meridian,'” Nichols said. “I could probably never get the rights and, frankly, to live in that world for the years that it would take to make it is pretty dark. But there are so many amazing visuals.”

Nichols trails off for a second. “If anyone ever gave you enough resources to do it correctly…” Nichols said. “Plus (frequent Nichols actor Michael) Shannon agreed to shave off his eyebrows to play the judge.”

“Loving” screens tonight at the Paramount.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Burton brings ‘Miss Peregrine’ to Fantastic Fest!

" Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children"
” Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children”

Tim Burton brings his adaptation of “Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children” while  Don Coscarelli, architect of the Phantasm series, delivers the world premiere of “Phantasm: Ravager” and a “remastered” print of “Phantasm” reps for Fantastic Fest announced Tuesday.

The 12th edition of the Drafthouse-based, genre-focused festival runs Sept 25 to 29.

Fantastic Fest 2016 posters
Fantastic Fest 2016 posters

Fantastic Fest also broke out the first wave of screenings, inlcuding a block of new and repertory South Asian features, including director Anurag Kashyareap’s cut of his violent 2016 picture “Psycho Raman,” the centuries-spanning epic “Magadheera” and the stylish Bollywood gangster film “Khalnayak.”

“We are celebrating not only Bollywood but also Tamil, Telugu and Malayalam cinema, said Fest programming head Evrim Ersoy. “highlighting the kaleidoscope of textures and content that is as wide and varied as the subcontinent itself.”

The special screening of “Phantasm: Remastered” which will stream live to art house theaters across the country celebrating Art House Theater Day Sept.24.  Coscarelli will be joined in attendance with cast members and “Ravager” director David Hartman.

Alamo Drafthouse’s film collectibles arm Mondo will also be participating with poster, apparel and soundtrack releases made exclusively for the screenings.

Fantastic Fest is also partnering with Los Angeles virtual reality studio Dark Corner to world-premiering Guy Shelmerdine’s  VR film “Mule,” his follow-up to “Catatonic,” which will also screen. Look for Justin Denton’s two-part horror piece “Burlap,” which is both a two-dimensional short film and an immersive VR experience. Audiences can watch the short film, then step inside the story with “Burlap: Reflections,” where they will experience the killer’s sinister obsession firsthand.

Everything Is Terrible! bring work to Fantastic Fest for the first time with the world première of their latest assemblage of found footage, while legendary exploitation filmmaker James Bryan (“Lady Street Fighter;” Don’t Go In the Woods) will be on hand to world-premiere his never-before-seen VHS-era horror movie “Jungle Trap.” Shot in 1990, the film was shelved unedited and without a musical soundtrack, but has finally been cut and scored a quarter century later.

Check out first wave film lineup below (and let us know what you think):

 

24X36: A MOVIE ABOUT MOVIE POSTERS

Canada, 2016

World Premiere, 83 min

Director – Kevin Burke

Through interviews with art personalities from the past four decades, 24 x 36 examines the birth, death and resurrection of illustrated movie poster art.

 

A DARK SONG

Ireland, 2016

World Premiere, 99 min

Director – Liam Gavin

Sophia is a determined young woman who hires a weird occultist to perform a ritual which will risk not only their lives and souls, but also the very essence of their being.

 

ALOYS

Switzerland, France, 2016

US Premiere, 91 min

Director – Tobias Nölle

Aloys Adorn is a lonely private investigator who, after the death of his father, finds himself sucked into a mysterious “telephone walking” game with a mysterious woman who might be his only hope.

 

AMERICAN HONEY

United States, 2016

Texas Premiere, 158 min

Director – Andrea Arnold

Andrea Arnold’s first US feature follows 18-year-old Star as she leaves her home in Oklahoma and goes in search of adventure, adulthood and America.

 

BELIEF: THE POSSESSION OF JANET MOSES

New Zealand, 2015

US Premiere, 89 min

Director – David Stubbs

The true story of the Wainuiomata exorcism provides the basis for David Stubbs’ striking debut feature, a documentary exploring the tragic death of Janet Moses in a traditional Maori exorcism ceremony.

 

THE CREW

France, 2016

US Premiere, 81 min

Director – Julien Leclercq

It’s bad men face versus worse men as thieves face off against dealers in this super slick French heist thriller from the director of Chrysalis and The Assault.

 

DEAREST SISTER

Laos, France, Estonia, 2016

World Premiere, 100 min

Director – Mattie Do

After moving to the city, a poor woman realizes her recently blinded cousin can not only commune with the dead, but they can provide a path to much-needed wealth.

 

DOWN UNDER

Australia, 2016

North American Premiere, 87 min

Director – Abraham Forsythe

In the aftermath of massive race riots, two carloads of dim-witted alpha males set off to defend their respective territory with outrageous results in this sharp edged Australian satire.

 

THE DWARVES MUST BE CRAZY

Thailand, 2016

World Premiere, 92 min

Director – Bhin Banloerit

A Thai village of little people is attacked by evil, butt-munching, fart-tracking Krause spirits – floating heads with attached intestines – in this slapstick horror-comedy.


FAULTLESS

France, 2016

North American Premiere, 103 min

Director – Sébastien Marnier

After burning out in Paris, Constance returns to her home town only to find herself in lethal competition with a younger girl for her old job.


FRAUD

United States, 2016

Texas Premiere, 53 min

Director – Dean Fleischer-Camp

A family’s home movies document a desperate crime, and the subsequent bid to escape the consequences in this impressionistic meta-fiction born from the manipulation of hundreds of hours of innocuous uploads to YouTube. An extraordinary feat of editing, a provocative parable of the pursuit of happiness and a disturbing demonstration of the mutability of the stories we share in the Internet age.


THE GREASY STRANGLER

United States, 2016

Special Screening, 93 min

Director – Jim Hosking

Ronnie fears his first love affair is turning his father into a bloodthirsty monster who’s covered in grease and has an 18-inch penis that looks like a dead chicken.

 

JUNGLE TRAP : Presented By Bleeding Skull

United States, 1990/2016

World Premiere, 80 min

Director – James Bryan

Exploitation demigod James Bryan’s massively entertaining, decapitation-fueled shot-on-video horror masterpiece about a jungle hotel haunted by kill-crazy ghosts in loin cloths, shot in 1990 and unreleased until THIS VERY MOMENT.

 

KHALNAYAK

India, 1993

Repertory Screening, 190 min

Director – Subhash Ghai

Ballu is an unrepentant gangster who has dedicated his life to the celebration of villainy. He is a bad, bad man and not ashamed one bit. However, with the help of his mother and a sympathetic cop, Ballu will rise above his circumstances to gain satisfying redemption.

 

MAGADHEERA

India, 2009

Repertory Screening, 157 min

Director – S.S. Rajamouli

Harsha, a dirt bike racer, lives for thrills. One day he crosses paths with Indu, a girl with whom he feels strangely connected. Through this bond, Harsha discovers his hidden identity: a reincarnated warrior king.

 

MISS PEREGRINE’S HOME FOR PECULIAR CHILDREN

United States, 2016

Special Screening, 123 min

Director – Tim Burton

From visionary director Tim Burton, and based upon the best-selling novel, comes an unforgettable motion picture experience.  When Jake discovers clues to a mystery that spans alternate realities and times, he uncovers a secret refuge known as Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. As he learns about the residents and their unusual abilities, Jake realizes that safety is an illusion, and danger lurks in the form of powerful, hidden enemies. Jake must figure out who is real, who can be trusted, and who he really is.

 

ORIGINAL COPY

Germany, 2016

Texas Premiere, 95 min

Directors – Florian Heinzen-Ziob and Georg Heinzen

In the heart of Mumbai, behind the screen of one of the last Hindi Film cinemas, lives Sheik Rahman, the city’s last painter of film posters. This is his story.

 

PHANTASM: REMASTERED (1979)

United States, 1979

Special Screening, 88 min

Director – Don Coscarelli

One of the most influential and important horror films of all time, Don Coscarelli’s Phantasm returns to Alamo Drafthouse’s screens in a gorgeous 4k remaster.

 

PHANTASM: RAVAGER

United States, 2016

World Premiere, 87

Director – David Hartman

The fifth and final film in the classic Phantasm film series, Phantasm Ravager follows our intrepid everyman hero Reggie on his quest across dark dimensions as he struggles to confront and vanquish the sinister Tall Man.

 

POPOZ

The Netherlands, 2015

International Premiere, 85 min

Directors- Erwin van de Eshof & Martijn Smits

Festival favorite Huub Smit (New Kids Nitro; New Kids Turbo; Bros Before Hos) stars as a Dutch cop raised on far too many American action films in this outrageous action comedy.

 

PSYCHO RAMAN

India, 2016

US Premiere, 127 min

Director – Anurag Kashyap

Raghavan is a cop: brutal, violent, and drug-addicted. Ramanna is a criminal: psychotic, unpredictable, and vicious. It’s only a matter of time before they meet and when they do, Mumbai’s slums will be colored deep crimson.

 

SALT AND FIRE

Mexico, 2016

North American Premiere, 93 min

Director – Werner Herzog

Herzog’s most wildly unpredictable film, Salt and Fire is a meticulously slow burning, quasi-ecological thriller punctuated by moments of the lyrically poetic and the inexplicably, outrageously absurd.

 

S IS FOR STANLEY

Italy, 2016

North American Premiere, 82 min

Director – Alex Infascelli

Alex Infascelli’s documentary about Emilio D’Alessandro, Stanley Kubrick’s personal assistant for more than thirty years, which provides never-before-seen insight into the private auteur.


THE VOID

Canada, 2016

World Premiere, 90 min

Directors – STEVEN KOSTANSKI & JEREMY GILLESPIE

Trapped in a hospital with a handful of people, a small town sheriff finds himself caught up in the demented plot of a death-obsessed madman.

 

 

 

WE ARE THE FLESH

Mexico, 2016

Texas Premiere, 80 min

Director – Emiliano Rocha Minter

Somewhere within a ruined city, a man makes an offer to a pair of siblings who wander into his abandoned building: food and shelter in exchange for building a strange room…

 

ZOOLOGY

Russia, France, Germany, 2016

US Premiere, 87 min

Director – Ivan I. Tverdovsky

Natasha is a lonely, middle-aged woman who still lives with her mother and feels insecure about her tedious life… until she grows a tail.

 

 

 

Four movies to see this weekend: “Eraserhead,” “Hoop Dreams,” “Private Property” and “Pete’s Dragon”

440px-Hoop_dreamsposter“Eraserhead.” David Lynch’s first film is the closest you can come to a filmed nightmare — a memorable vision of anxiety, horror and the shifting fabric of subjective reality. 8 to 10 p.m. Friday, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Aug 2. $7-$10. AFS Cinema, 6226 Middle Fiskville Road. austinfilm.org.

“Hoop Dreams.” One of the most popular and influential documentaries of the 1990s, director Steve James followed William Gates and Arthur Agee, two talented high-school basketball players who are shooting for the NBA. A powerful, important film.  7 p.m. Aug. 29. Stateside at the Paramount. Sunday. $12. The Paramount, 713 Congress Ave. austintheatre.org.

“Private Property.” Outer Limits creator Leslie Stevens wrote and directed this fascinating black and white tle of two homicidal Southern California drifters (Warren Oates and Corey Allen) who drift into the life of unhappy housewife Kate Manx. “Private Property” was completely lost until UCLA Film & TV Archive recently located the only known 35mm elements, which have been restored in 4k. 4:15 p.m.$9.50.  July 30. Alamo Drafthouse Ritz,  320 East Sixth St.

4174_4157-petes-dragon-poster-14d_D07C“Pete’s Dragon.” The Austin Film Society and the Paramount Theatre have teamed up for this special advance benefit screening of “Pete’s Dragon,” with the director David Lowery in attendance. All proceeds will support the AFS’s artist services programs. 1 p.m. July 31. $12-$56. The Paramount, 713 Congress Ave. austintheatre.org.

Giveaway: Be a watcher at ‘Nerve’ advance screening

“Are you a watcher or a player?”

That’s what the fictional (or is it real?) online game Nerve asks curious millennials in the upcoming film starring Emma Roberts and Dave Franco. The two “players” get caught up in a string of increasingly menacing dares that drive them deeper and deeper into the game.

The film won’t be officially released until July 27, but we’re giving away passes to an advance screening two days earlier. To enter the contest, check us out on Instagram at @austin360, find the post with the promo code and enter that code at LionsgateScreenings.com.

Fifty lucky winners will be given admit-two first come, first serve passes to attend the screening of ‘Nerve’ at 7 p.m. on Monday, July 25 at AMC Barton Creek Square 14. You can hope to be a watcher, but first, you have to play.

 

NEW YORK, NY - JULY 12: (EDITORS NOTE: This image was converted to black and white using digital filters) Actors Dave Franco (L) and Emma Roberts attend the "Nerve" New York Premiere at SVA Theater on July 12, 2016 in New York City. (Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images)
Actors Dave Franco (L) and Emma Roberts attend the “Nerve” New York Premiere at SVA Theater on July 12, 2016 in New York City. (Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images)

The wonderful world of Disney is finally headed to Netflix

FILE - In this Friday, Jan. 17, 2014, file photo, a person displays Netflix on a tablet in North Andover, Mass. Netflix reports quarterly financial results on Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)
In this Friday, Jan. 17, 2014, file photo, a person displays Netflix on a tablet in North Andover, Mass. Netflix reports quarterly financial results on Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)

The time has finally come. Netflix announced Monday that it will become the exclusive U.S. pay TV home of the latest films from Disney, Marvel, Lucasfilm and Pixar, starting in September.

Though specific films weren’t named, Netflix’s head of content Ted Sarandos listed other new additions coming at users this summer. In June, we can expect sci-fi adventure classics like the first three original “Jurassic Park” films and Oscar-winner “Spotlight.”

July welcomes “The Big Short” and Netflix Original “Brahman Naman” while “The Little Prince” and “The Fast and the Furious” arrives in August.

Basically, if you thought you were going to be active this summer, Netflix is going to shut that dream down pretty quickly. Oh well.

Cannes Day 9: Five weird things about ‘The Neon Demon’

 

Elle Fanning in "The Neon Demon."
Elle Fanning in “The Neon Demon.”

Nicolas Winding Refn’s “The Neon Demon” premiered at Cannes Thursday night, and it has to be one of the strangest takes on the horror genre ever made. Here are five things you need to know before seeing it.

  1. It’s bound to be unrated. Refs has always pushed boundaries, but this stylish film also features necrophilia from no other than Jena Malone. She works in the coroner’s office and puts makeup on the dead, when she’s not working for fashion executives.
  2. The movie’s tagline should be: If you can’t beat them, eat them. Yep, we’re talking supermodel cannibals.
  3. Elle Fanning seems like such a nice girl at first, but something goes terribly wrong with her. She knows all the other supermodels want to “be” her. So she really should be a bit more careful about choosing her friends. She says she’s not as innocent as she looks, but can she do battle with vicious supermodel cannibals?
  4. The soundtrack by Cliff Martinez is fantastic. He’s reportedly coming to Austin in June for interviews, and it’s time to brush up on his past.
  5. Refn thrives on controversy, so he probably won’t be too sorry to hear that his movie got wild boos on Thursday night at its press premiere. The press conference is on Friday. Be there or be eaten.