Ten takeaways from “Made in Austin: A Look into Song to Song” at SXSW

http://players.brightcove.net/1418563061/S15Aq3t8_default/index.html?videoId=5355819236001

 

Holy cats, there he is: Director Terrence Malick, one of the most private filmmakers of his generation, hanging out on stage with Richard Linklater and Michael Fassbender, the latter a star of Malick’s “Song to Song,” chatting Saturday morning at South by Southwest.

REVIEW: The gorgeous ‘Song to Song’ has little to do with music or Austin

PHOTOS: ‘Song to Song’ red carpet at the Paramount Theater

The original cut was about eight hours long. “There was no part of the shooting day that was idle,” Fassbender said. “If we were on the way to a location, we were shooting on the way to the location.”

On finding the character as one goes and the improvisational nature of the shoot. “I like not having lines to learn.” Fassbender said. “It’s a very liberating thing when you’re not carrying dialogue. It’s very hard not to load an intention if I am getting lines as I go.”

From left, Rooney Mara, Michael Fassbender and Ryan Gosling star in Terrence Malick’s “Song to Song.” Contributed by Van Redin / Broad Green Pictures

Sometimes, Malick is shooting something that is not the actor. “I’ll be acting my socks off and Terry will be filming a beetle,” Fassbender said.

On setting his films now rather than in the past.  Malick said he was a bit timid at setting his films in the present. “(One struggles to find) images you can use that haven’t been a part of advertising,” Malick said. “But then you find there are as many today as there were in the past.”

The original title was “Weightless.” “We had a title card from Virginia Woolf at the beginning,” Malick said. (“How can I proceed now, I said, without a self, weightless and visionless, through a world weightless…”). This ended up still being a bit of a theme.

On having, as Linklater put it, “punk rock elders” in the film. “I was trying not to be overwhelmed by these rock gods,” Fassbender said, “but I do remember that both Patti Smith and Flea, you would put the camera on them and words would just flow out. And then all of the Chili Peppers beat me up.”

Fassbender wishes there was more Val Kilmer kept in. “I was hanging on by my fingernails,” Fassbender said. “He is a force. To be in (this kind of movie), you have to be prepared to fall on your face over and over again all day. That is what I found so impressive about Val.”

On Fassbender maybe directing. “I would like to direct,” Fassbender said. “What would I like to direct? Something contained.” Which this film was not.

“I have no idea when,” he continued. “Starting as an actor, I found I was so focused for so many years on getting an opportunity to work, then focused on getting a lead role. (Now that he has done both of those things) I’ve started to enjoy more and more the collaborative process, the idea that you get the bunch of strangers together and get it to gel.”

On Austin changing. “Your film is already a period film,” Linklater joked. This is actually true, as Malick noted — Alamo Drafthouse South looks totally different now.

Linklater and Malick versus the movie: “Everything you see is the tip of the iceberg (for these characters),” Linklater said. “(To see these movies), I think it just adds a depth, a poetic memory feeling.”

In seeing the bits of pieces of their lives, Malick said, “It’s like the dialogue in the movie, ‘Can you live in this world moment to moment, song to song, kiss to kiss.’ It’s a hard thing to convey.”

 

 

 

 

New details about Terrence Malick’s Austin music scene movie

Remember when Texas filmmaking legend Terrence Malick was seen filming in and around such events as South by Southwest and Fun Fun Fun Fest a few years back?

Well, that was for a movie we now know, thanks to a piece on IndieWire, is called “Song to Song,” which will be out March 17 (which seems to make it a mortal lock for a SXSW screening).

Here is the premise, according to IndieWire:

“In this modern love story set against the Austin, Texas music scene, two entangled couples — struggling songwriters Faye (Rooney Mara) and BV (Ryan Gosling), and music mogul Cook (Michael Fassbender) and the waitress whom he ensnares (Natalie Portman) — chase success through a rock ‘n’ roll landscape of seduction and betrayal.”

The sharp-eyed might recall seeing Mara, Gosling and Fassbender in and around Fun Fun Fun in 2012. And that Val Kilmer guy.

Rooney Mara (left), Val Kilmer (center) and Black Lips guitarist Cole Alexander on the Blue Stage at Fun Fun Fun Fest on Nov,. 2, 2012. (photo: Pooneh Ghana)
Rooney Mara (left), Val Kilmer (center) and Black Lips guitarist Cole Alexander on the Blue Stage at Fun Fun Fun Fest on Nov. 2, 2012. (Contributed by Pooneh Ghana)

 

 Look for Patti Smith, Lykke Li, the above Black Lips, Iggy Pop, Florence and the Machine and more in the film.